Category Archives: Press freedom

Due prominence

The Leveson inquiry examining the culture, practices and ethics of the press concluded with a printed report on the 29th November 2012. It recommended that the press – having failed to effectively regulate itself, despite being given more than one chance to do so – be regulated by a truly independent regulator with some form […]

Has the Daily Mail Jumped the Shark?

The TV show Happy Days in many people’s view went in to a terminal decline when The Fonze jumped over a shark whilst water-skiing. Watching the show always involved suspending disbelief to quite a large extent as the Fonze is clearly a ridiculous character but the point when he jumped over a shark was the […]

Children of famous parents and their right to privacy

Another thing I would like to see from the Leveson Inquiry is the conclusion that plastering the faces of young children across newspapers and their websites simply because they have been born to famous parents is utterly unacceptable. The PCC code of practice does mention Children and states: Editors must not use the fame, notoriety […]

Richard Peppiatt’s speech to the Leveson inquiry

Your must read article of the day, largely because it is someone from inside the newspaper industry confirming my own arguments about how media narratives are constructed and adhered to by all of the journalists working for a particular newspaper: In approximately 900 newspaper bylines I can probably count on fingers and toes the times […]

Crime and _________?

One of the things that has always struck me about the Press Complaints Commission is that it rarely seems able to punish newspapers even when they make serious errors – or worse they are caught out deliberately lying. Very often this means that the only way a member of the public can feel like any […]

What about the real news?

Today’s Daily Mail editorial condenses all of the basic arguments that have been trotted out by their ever-so-compliant columnists in the past week as to why we should all forget about hacking and move onto something else: ‘Never mind phone hacking, what about the real issues facing Britain?‘ [istyosty.com link]. In the real world, bleak […]

Journalists go on the attack

As I commented last night the morally bankrupt newspaper industry wouldn’t spend long aiming their bile at the News of the World and would instead find new people to blame for the NOTW’s demise. No Sleep ‘Til Brooklands looks at Telegraph journalist Brendan O’Neill who blames Twitter and a few liberals for closing the NOTW, […]

The Wriggling Begins

The News of the World has just published its last ever edition after an increasing number of revelations / allegations over the tactic of phone hacking and the expectation that worse behaviour is yet to be revealed. The story is so big and the behaviour of the NOTW so outrageous that the newspaper industry has […]

David Cameron admits he was badly wrong about the PCC

Im May this year David Cameron – appearing on Radio 4′s Today Programme – defended the concept of press self-regulation and in particular he made sure he directed some praise towards the PCC. He said: “I sense that there’s still more to be done to recognise that actually the Press Complaints Commission has come on […]

Kia Abdullah is not a Guardian columnist

Paul Dacre, and therefore the Mail, seems to hold a special contempt for the Guardian. Dacre’s speech to the Society of Editors back in 2008 had lots to say about the criticism that newspapers received – largely because Dacre: passionately believe[s] that Britain has the best newspapers in the world and – indeed, our papers […]